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to adapt. that was not so much an advantage because the environment did not change quickly. it is the normal process of biological evolution, changing behavior over thousands of generations. it is good enough for non medallion species until the cretaceous extinction event sixty-five million years ago. we see geological evidence of it everywhere in the world, something dramatic happened to change the environment suddenly sixty-five million years ago. there are theories about it having to do with a meteor but we do know the environment changed. thousands of these non minnelli and species who could not adapt very quickly died out and that is when mammals became prominent in their ecological niche. anthropomorphize biological evolution and said it started -- as mammals evolved. by the time you get to primates it is no longer just a plant covering in the brain, it has all these convolutions. you are familiar with what the brain looks like. to expand its surface area. in the human or any primate it has all these fissures and curves. you can stretch out in theory and make a flat s
be a fish or bird or species of some kind or for his spirit must rethink about the environment and our place an icon of the species of concern became honest. what we were doing to the environment and to ourselves in the process. so i think when we look back five decades in the rearview mirror, we can actually see the beginnings of this change in the way we think about the natural world. i call rachel carson a tipping point between these two things. she had a strong presence in the conservation movement and was really an effect founder of the modern environmental movement. i think it's possible to point to a specific movement in time when that happened, when we begin to think about our environment and relationship to the tiered it came in the late summer of 1962 a month before "silent spring" was published. in june 1962 from "the new yorker" magazine published excerpts from "silent spring" and through the course of the summer, huge controversy flared up around the book and people began to take sides, and people began to become worried about what carson was warning everyone about. by the end o
but that is very focused and it's a great teaching and i love this environment. i have colleagues as a great man on economics and a lot of other colleagues and disciplines and they really deserve a shot. she is one of a global leader in documenting and researching but also working practically on the human trafficking. president laws of the clinton global the initiative announcing a major new direction on this topic and there are many people that work on this topic to have helped move it forward on the agenda but one of them as a lot of credit. >> we've been talking with philip auerswald, the coming prosperity, entrepreneurs are transforming the global economy. his most recent book. book tv on location at george mason university. >>> now on book tv, alex berezow argues that while antiscience is usually a term associated with conservatives, the left in the united states has plenty of problems with science when it comes to issues they don't support. it's about an hour and a half. >> my name is kenneth agreement and a resident scholar here at the enterprise institute and i work on primarily energy a
government not being moral, it is the opposite of what it purports to do and creates an environment we have less ability to get ahead increased dependency and not a sense of independence. it plessis crony capitalism, which hurts oil entrepreneurship and creativity. all the things the government says it does hopes the poor to make sure the markets: the right direction. they do the opposite. their short-term oriented, writes to the next election. they have their own agenda. they don't respond to the marketplace the way business has to do. they have their own agenda of interest groups. the bigger they get, the more harm they do on the less chance you have to improve your lot in life. >> host: how is it free markets make it moral? is morality part of capitalism? >> guest: morality is the basis of capitalism. the whole thing about free markets based on values in meeting the needs and wants of other people. contrary to the hollywood cartoon terra of business people rubbing their hands in "glee" at the misery of others. even if you for money, you don't get it unless you provide a product or servi
in environments where we were always subject to threat so we are looking at things that are going to hurt us, but we are no longer in those environments. we are in a complex economy this interdependent and that really relies on organizations to provide us even with other subsidies. as we have to update our thinking and think longer terms, focus on stories that actually represent the trends come and not exaggerate malaise, and we have to get away from a year. so fear played a role in the development of human societies and the earliest stages. it is encoded in our dna. but, to evolve to the sort of complex modern environment that we live, we have to update the most basic aspects. and so that's what your question speaks to. >> are you fearful of venture capitalists? >> you know, the opposite of that i might say well, you know, venture-capital list has to be inherently optimistic because why would you invest in something where there are uncertain returns and so forth, telling the story about the coming prosperity, that's a story that is easily characterized and that is not in this book, and i re
it, is the things we are doing to the environment, making these things more unbearable. construction, an earthquake there was one in chile that killed less than a hundred people, fewer than a hundred people. all of these things, and people have been forced to leave the countryside, to come to the city. so we often also discussed these things and how devotion in the land -- how it causes us to have these massive mudslides and flooding when a hurricane goes through. these things, they are more of the things that we can do something about as a community. but these other theories, they are also talked about. >> host: in reading through your book, "so spoke the earth: the haiti i knew, the haiti i know, the haiti i want to know", i was struck that so many writers return to haiti. >> guest: i think so many of us come as children. we were a lot like our parents. arkansas like they had no choice to leave. so you do have this yearning for your country. and i have a lot of family that i did quite a lot. but there is this yearning, things that are parents described as a paradise and things to f
-intentioned authoritarian leaders because they raileesed to survive in that environment you have to succumb to that environment. you have to assimilate into that environment. so, the system in syria is very inert in that sense and was much more difficult to overcome, obviously, and perhaps he didn't have the -- where with annual and ability to take on the real forces in syria who are status quo forces and against any change that might undermine the foundation of their rule and situation. >> the situp in syria by the colonial powers was france was working with a shiite sect, which is a minority, who were to look after the sunnies, who are the majority. 10% or shias of another sect. assad belongs to this sect ands the military is from this sect and the elite are from this sect. correct? >> partial limit he would not be able to rule if it was only them in the inner circle. >> they basically in control. >> they're dominant in the military apparatus but they have also done a very good job, started under his father. of coe opting many sunnies, christians in particular and others, into the apparat
from his patronage. that environment created an atmosphere as well and which the islamic opposition take greater group and was essentially cards become more and more virulent. the number of events which because of our lack of understanding of what was going on in libyan would in retrospect signal, you know, to people who are watching this that things are not going well. essentially the people work getting increasingly frustrated with qaddafi and had the potential to the explode. you had the -- another event, the massacre in 1996 in which 120050 people were killed. this was by -- under the supervision allegedly of the head of internal intelligence. this was a very important thing because the victims of that massacre were primarily political prisoners and from the eastern part of the country. the east, you know, in a very tightly knit tribal society, this act of that magnitude basically created a cascading resentment which came to the haunted qaddafi basically. this was -- that was a major event in creating resentment against the regime. by 1997 benghazi was essentially in a state of
, democracy, and the new media information environment." watch these programs and more all weekend long on booktv. visit booktv.org for a complete schedule. >>> next on booktv, the former deputy assistant secretary of commerce argues that the u.s. is and will continue to be a leader in manufacturing and innovation. it's about 45 minutes. ♪ >> thank you. thank you for the very kind introduction. it's a real honor to be at politics and prose, such an institution to the city, and it's really a pleasure to be here. thank you to everyone for coming out on an august evening to hear me. i will try to be brief in my comments, and i would rather have more of an exchange of ideas and hear your perspective and so that we can have a conversation about manufacturing and what our country should do to be competitive. the book, the idea for the book came above when i was traveling around the country, and i would go, and i would see a successful manufacturer making blenders, making steel, making fire stones, making meats, and food, and i would say, you know, i thought all of our manufacturing had gone
environment. the third sister was alan. she lasted both of resistors and is working for skinner at the time of the flood and is a stronger character of the book and after words help to salvage his silk and she moved to holyoke and ultimately married his bookkeeper. after the flood the valley could potentially be somebody else's gain. after the disaster the valley was a popular spot for investors and capitalist. investors came as far away from omaha nebraska to give them incentives to relocate to other areas. one of the most vocal voices was from holyoke massachusetts. they were ingenious lee is specifically designed for industry. it was hoped to be greater than the urban centers. holyoke was the greatest potential power of new england. the dam the connecticut river on the right is at the crest of a 60-foot fall capable of generating 30,000-horsepower that was the power of 300 mills. the cotton lords that created holyoake devised a three tiered canal system. it does not show on this map the connecticut river could be used over three times. holyoke made offers to the manufacturers in the vall
. but it was also the case that in some environments that i wonder if in the disabled community, which was such an important stewardship, are their attempts to find ways to create technology and multi-sensory experiences for readers as they consume cultural artifacts certainly real book is a multi-sensory experience within itself. that is an old technology comparable to the print book. beyond that, i believe that there is not very much work being done in that area and i am very anxious that we should be able to provide braille to people in the disabled community to the music. the reason for that goes back, i think, to where it makes sense. obviously, it makes a lot of sense. but it is also a reading experience that is very different from audio reading and experiences that way. a lot of people have come to the conclusion that it is just as good for a blind person to listen to a book to read it in braille, and i totally disagree with that. it's a very difficult way of learning however, and i don't think it gives the generation of functionally illiterate kids by telling them just listen t
in an environment, at least i was fortunate enough, where we believed it was effective. you know it's very -- pretty much acceptable or maybe in vogue somewhat today to be so critical or almost invariably critical of the country and pointing out what is wrong. there are obviously things wrong. there are obviously things wrong when i grew up in georgia, and that was pointed out. but there was always an underlying belief that we were entitled to be a full participant in we the people. that is the way we grew up. it was the way the nuns who were all immigrants would explain it to us, that we were entitled as citizens of this country to be full participants. there was never any doubt that we were inherently equal and it said so in the declaration of independence. of course there were times later on bad i too became quite critical and would make glib remarks in deciding the not so pleasant and reciting the pledge of allegiance or sing things that i thought were -- [inaudible] people can youtube and it's around forever. i grew up in an environment where the people around me believed that this country coul
in today's environment. whether it is pared back as a matter for legislators and the one making process to look at, but clearly the copyright itself should be maintained. whether it should be maintained exactly in this framework is an open question. >> access -- >> where do you stand on this? spending money on the book. [talking over each other] >> a lot of books -- [talking over each other] >> there are materials that are locked up, the orphan works or things that libraries all over the world find, and that is why we are very hopeful that the digital public library of america will help with the digitization of materials and also the projects that are going on so that you can unleash these things. we would love to think about it, and millions and millions, also think about the digitization that is going to take. >> that -- [talking over each other] >> they have a lousy deal on the publishing side. but still in process. >> they will be here on tuesday probably discussing these things. still fighting google, there is an appeal. the next panel -- [talking over each other] >> from the libra
and isolated the in the sea walls or limit the deployment of the diplomats to the low risk environments. it's important that we meet with the afghan village elder and a schoolteacher, assist the female activist in south sudan to read one of the reasons investors stevens traveled to benghazi was to open an american corner, a place where the average libyans could go to learn more about the united states and american values. at last month's hearing on benghazi, ambassador newman framed the issue well. how much risk are we willing to take to accomplish a particular mission and how important is that mission to the national purpose? and high risk environment, our policy makers must ask and answer these difficult but necessary questions. in some cases, the benefits will outweigh the danger. in other cases, they may not. the accountability review board chaired by ambassador thomas pickering just submitted its report this week i would like to thank ambassador pickering and the other members of the board for agreeing to take on this solemn responsibility this reaches a number of troubling conclusions
, is the environment. and i'm going to end by telling a story of a young harvard college graduate, beautiful spring day in 1844 went for a walk in the woods outside of concord, and he did a little fishing, and the fishing was good. and then he came to cook the fish into a chowder. it is boston, after all. [laughter] and the wind came and flicked the flames that he was using to nearby dry grass, and a fire started, and it spread, and it spread. and eventually, it turned into a raging inferno which burn withed down more than 300 acres of prime woodland. in his own day this man was cast away, and it's hard not to see they were right because i can't think of any young man living in boston or cambridge who did as much damage to the environment as this man did. he is, of course, henry david thoreau whose book walden seems to preach a gospel, but his own life tells a very different story. his own life preaches the moral that we are a destructive species, and if you love nature, stay away from it. [laughter] as, indeed, thoreau would have done the world a wonderful amount of good if he had stayed home. now, th
together. it was very much a family environment. the third sister to come work for skinner was ellen littlefield. now, ellen outlasted both of her sisters at the mill, and she was working for skinner at the time of flood. she is the strongest female character in my book. after the flood. >> she also worked with skinner helping to salvage his silk, and she moved to holyoke and ultimately married his bookkeeper. now, after the flood the valley's loss was going to be or could be potentially someone else's gain. so after the disaster happened, the valley was a very popular spot for investors and capitalists. offers came from all over, from as far away as omaha, nebraska, to the manufacturers that had lost everything giving them incentives to move elsewhere and to relocate to other areas. one of the most vocal voices in this choir was that of holyoke, massachusetts. and holyoke was an ingeniously-designed city, specifically designed for industry. it was hoped to be even greater than the urban mill centers of lawrence. holyoke was considered to be the greatest potential mill power in new e
said, i grew up in an environment which was christian, which people followed their christian religion. others followed their muslim religion and others their african superstitions. and for me, this went to the heart of why the book became inevitable, or why i have been engaged in this discourse all my life. very strange. i find it very -- pretty close to 80, i should actually exist in an environment in which, for believing what i believe, or not believing what i do not believe, i'd be considered what i call terminal censorship. and go back to my history, and i don't mean me personally. the time when i lived and was raised. the history of my people. when the european explorers, of course, quickly followed by their religious storm troopers, the christian missionaries. they had a very serious problem and that was they couldn't find satan. they couldn't find the devil. if you want to convert people, you've got to first of all persuade them their soul is in dire danger. headed to the ultimate bonfire on the other side of existence. after that you need to label them followers of the devil
that was happening in the area. a number of different things in environment that we had no idea. later, many kids in my neighborhood, i worked at the plant myself. got a sense of what it's like to be on the inside of the plant. there was one evening when i came home, from work at rocky flats, and turned on the television and it was a show on "nightline" that it was an exposÉ of what was really happening at the plant. and it was the first time that a really have an awareness, really have an understanding of what was happening at rocky flats and how extent -- extraordinary the contamination was but it was on that day i decided to quit my job at rocky flats come at the day i decided i would write a book about it. it took me about 10 years of research and writing to pull the story together. and i wanted to write a book that reads like a novel, but is very heavily footnoted come everything in the book is factual. so you can check back and see where the information comes from. but i wanted to write this story from the perspective of all of the different kinds of people whose lives have been affected b
for carrying it out. family life, community life, health, education, the environment, national security, civic life. in these domains, cash incentives, monetary arrangements, financial deals may crowd out values and attitudes that are central to what makes those goods the goods they are. if this is true, what are the occasions for the way we should make about these questions? one application is we can't decide where markets are, where they serve the public. and where they don't belong that reasoning together, without having a public debate about the likely effects of marketers sort of social practices and to debate about how those goods should be valued, whether it's teaching and learning for environmental protection were civic life. this is a debate we have not had in this country over the past few decades. we've been governed by a kind of market face it just assumes that are considered the primary instrument for achieving the public good. we haven't really questioned that. we shied away from these to be and the effect has been markets have reached into more and more spheres of life, includin
environment? [applause? >> that is a terrific question. it is hard to answer but part of the answer is the following -- when lyndon johnson became majority leader of the senate in 1955, the senate was and had been for decades, let's put it that way, the same mess, the same dysfunctional mess that it is today. bills couldn't get past because the power than that confronted a president wasn't a party, wasn't republicans against democrats, it was an interparty division. half of the democrats in the senate were southern democrats who were as conservative as can be imagined on civil-rights and everything else. they in that year, 1975, the 16 great standing committees and the senate, the republicans were -- seeing your committee posts were stacked and subcommittees were headed buy them. they had stopped every president. no one seems to realize this but in the 25 years after the supreme court packing fight when southern conservatives realize they and the midwestern republicans were on the same side and could control congress no president, not franklin roosevelt, not truman, ever got a major
mentioned he had worked as a steamboat engineer. the question and the boy in the steamer environment, such a job, he said knowingly. in the boiling steam room, he pointed out the suffocating temperature of the furnace room in a narrow space between two rows of furnaces which glare like the fires of hell. he shoveled in 140 degrees fahrenheit. sawyer survived twice that long, five years, which is the average, which was because he was a fireman of every sense of the word. you furnaces in every aspect of combustion intimately. stronger track, the thicker the fire should be. his face lit up in the clouds of steam as he warmed to the topic. no hollow places are allowed to form under it, and the temperature increases as fuel reaches its state of brilliant white incandescents. sawyer could tell temperature within a few degrees by the coals color. 90 degrees fahrenheit, cherry red indicated 1470 degrees. the orange meant the temperature exceeded 2000 degrees. [inaudible] if the temperature was climbing beyond the limits, it had to be kept down. before sawyer abandoned and forgot, he had made
it wasn't perfect. that's an understatement. but you grow up in an environment, at least i was fortunate enough, where we believed it was effective. you know it's very -- pretty much acceptable or maybe in vogue somewhat today to be so critical or almost invariably critical of the country and pointing out what is wrong. there are obviously things wrong. there are obviously things wrong when i grew up in georgia, and that was pointed out. but there was always an underlying belief that we were entitled to be a full participant in we the people. that is the way we grew up. it was the way the nuns who were all immigrants would explain it to us, that we were entitled as citizens of this country to be full participants. there was never any doubt that we were inherently equal and it said so in the declaration of independence. of course there were times later on bad i too became quite critical and would make glib remarks in deciding the not so pleasant and reciting the pledge of allegiance or sing things that i thought were -- [inaudible] people can youtube and it's around forever. i grew up in
an environment there was spirit and was spun by the development of late george w. norris who came to nebraska and fought for the unicameral legislature and nonpartisan. some people say he did it because he wanted to save money. i am sure it saves money to have one house, but the main reason he did it is to get rid of the conference committees that we go through the back here that are a puzzle. i was at a conference committee on the football field and bate changes five times before they blow the whistle. so what we have in nebraska is something that is officially nonpartisan and looks nonpartisan, so that is a backdrop for me. so when i come here in a partisan environment, i said i don't have to subscribe to partisan environment. mauney goal and my team as the governor is to run nebraska, not republican or democratic or east or west urban, i represent all the people even those that voted against me. i've taken that approach back here to represent all the people, not just other people. >> did you ever think about becoming an independent? >> the democratic party never pushed it out to greet you
to create an environment that's friendly to business and capital so that businesses and capital come here, and then we'll have more in the future, and we can grow our consumption, and we can grow our well being. we can have 4% growth. but the reason why you need to read the book is that it makes sense, and we all need to become advocates for doing the sense bl thing. because the sensible thing is the last thing people in washington are talking about right now. [laughter] >> and i think there are four chapters in the book that sort of sum it up; president bush's forward, my introduction, brendan's chapter on why growth, and kevin's chapter, chapter 6, which presents three or or four, as he just outlined, quick ways to growth. maybe that's the best answer to your question. other questions? >> actually, could i just follow on that for a second? >> sure. >> one of the goals we have in this book is to change the conversation to growth. we have this debate between austerity and growth. growth really matters, okay? if you're growing, all right? to get the economy growing, people want to prosper,
the stimulus not only did good for the economy, but what it means for the environment. it's a story that's gotten lost on the politics. >> host: we have to have your comment as an employee of "usa today." we have to have you comment on u.s.a. tomorrow. guess what i should think sir for her plug for that. the newspaper in september was 30 years old from this little bunch of reporters were sent out to talk to people who could predict what the world be like 30 years from now, which would leave, what are we talking about, 2042? fare as his little better that than i am. anyway, they made their predictions there was talk about what it means for their industry. we put out a little tab and now that tab is now an e-book, which i think you can buy with a grand total of $1.89. it hasn't really taken off yet. the short form, somewhere between a book and magazine. amazon has been doing them. they can be posted almost immediately. and they sell for two or $3, $4, maybe more. if you have made the sellers list. some have been some fiction. a story she called to him to be a short story and too short to b
for the economy but what it means for the environment, sort of a story that got lost in all the politics in washington. >> we have to have you comment as an employee of usa today on u.s. aid tomorrow. >> and the day after. the newspaper in september was 30 years old so a bunch of reporters were sent out to talk to people who could predict what the world would be like 30 years from now which would be what are we talking about? 20, 40, 2042. >> we talked about what it means for their industry and we put out a little tab and now that tab, broadsheet is now an e-book which i think you can buy for the grand total of $1.99. it hasn't really taken off yet. the short form somewhere in between a book and magazine, there are a lot of good ones, amazon has been doing them, they posted almost immediately and they sell for $2 or $3. a few of them have made the best-seller list, some have been fiction. amy tan wrote the story she called too long to be a short story and too short to be a novel and focused on that. >> the wars continue to produce books including "little america: the war within the war f
to experience work environments. long hours and everything else working life entails. wherever you go, there's always listens. it may not be where you want, but i'm sure there's going to be a lesson learned. every adolescent is the opportunity to prepare for work so they can start careers at an equal stance. [applause] >> i'm looking for a young man from one else. again, there's a case of mistaken identity. the one nearest to me. >> young people in my constituency said evenness goes as good when it got experience, but why can't you and skills in the classroom such as lifelong learning that the curriculum. work experience is always good, but you're not going to go to get the skills and this is good, but i think it would be better for one people in the long run. [applause] >> i'm sorry there is confusion in monaco. i would now like to call the woman who thought i was calling but i wasn't he running it now. every shia from, please. [inaudible] >> we need your experience and training for work in the modern world if this is essential for young people. for me, work experience is the best opportuni
partisan political environment. this is just under an hour. [applause] >> it's all downhill from there. [laughter] my lawyer will take any complaints later. thank you so much, and thank you to what, for what you all do here. i am a, i shopped here as a young washington monthly editor. shopped is too strong. we didn't have any money. as you all may remember, washington monthly editors were paid $10,000 a year which, as kate boo -- who won the national book award last night adding to her amazing list of of accomplishments -- kate used to say she knew she had actually graduated from the monthly when she could buy entrees as well as appetizers in restaurants. so i never actually spent money here, but i'll try to fix that. i am enormously grateful. i am a southerner, i'm from tennessee and think that understanding jeffson in his regional context as well as his national context and his political context is hugely important. he was a master of politics whether it was idealogically driven or geographically driven, and i think there's something resonant about a ferociously-divided atmosphere, b
that and answers that question. we need government but we need government to create a stable environment for businesses to function and to create jobs. when government metals too much into the economy, government and its decisions and policies are driven by politics, and markets are driven by the desire of individuals and companies to meet the need that the real world needs people. that's the difference in what government does and what markets do. so you need government to create, to protect us from fraud, from wrongdoers. there are wrongdoers and government can protect us from them, but overly meddlesome government will, it goes too far and you end up depressing enterprise and innovation and job creation. >> the 2008 financial situation and the so-called bailout, are you supportive of that government intervention? >> we raise and answer the question in that book. you could see that as sort of, you know, emergency intervention. if the government had done it and got now that would've been fine but, unfortunately, they stayed too long. i think the comparison we make is to katrina. there's
in a different environment. i'm not saying that they are more welcoming to media attention. but they came of age in the world where, you know, they have sought after this. and you know, justice scalia has written a book. only william douglas in the past provokes. this sort of personal, you know, publicity seeking on their part, it is different than historically. frankly, i think it's a very good thing. i think when they go out and talk about books, they become little bit more accessible. >> it is funny. because byron white's folder lock ehrlichs, he felt that the relationships with byron right changed. the clerks felt that something changed. now, i don't know whether or not the justice has completely changed, but if you go back and you look at newspaper articles, it does a lot of service to the justices. just livid and talking about how this young man should be taught. anthony schooley himself said that if any of his law clerks do that, they would hunt him down. some would be just as curious of what happened today. >> i would like to ask each of you, all five of you, if you would please tell us
that says you're a person do too. you know you deeply moving. it was in this environment the ronald reagan went to sea pack and said we need bold colors no pale pastel. he was throwing down a battle sign. he was saying don't tell me you have a sellout. don't tell me you have a cave. don't tell me you have do whatever the left wants. there are moments in history where you draw a line and fight. we have thirty governors. we a huge number of state legislators. the idea we are supposed to create a center caucus in order to be socially acceptable in washington is absurd. that's what people are currently forming in washington. how much do i need to surrender so he won't beat me anymore? when i was family elected to congress, it turns out of my bad scheduling with the second time i ran jimmy carter was head of the democratic ticket. it was the best campaign technical ily i ever ran. it felt good toward the end. everything feels right because you're the candidate in the middle of the mess. i went in to vote on election day 1973 and the state of georgia was and i found myself standing in line. behi
. ultimately that was what we knew and what we understood about our environment. >> within the family, what were some of the dynamics? >> my father was latin -- mexico-american. my mother was european-american so that kind of created a very tense -- sort of other complicated household, and they had a lot of children right away, in the late '60s, early 70s, and i don't know if this is actually traditional to most hispanic or latin american families but my sisters were the property of my mother, and my brother and myself were the property of my dad, and as boys, working with a father who own as trucking company, we were sort of like the indentured laborers and my sisters were learning this phenomenal, idealic lifestyle aspirin successes. so that's one of the tensions i draw from early on in the book. >> how much of your family is still alive and what did they think of the book? >> every member of my family is still alive. even my grandmother, and while the story is tough and gritty, they've actually been supportive. my mother and my father haven't really come to terms with it. they find the s
or shrug us off. that that was environment the cost of planetary dominatiodominatio n that had begun to haunt us. we live with all three legacies of around the world travel, every emerging fear that the planet could simply shrugged this off, continuing confidence if we might be able to generate technology and political alliances to dominate the planet but doubt that it is always wise to dominate it in that way. is especially apparent that the characteristic confidence of the long 19th century was the shortest of planetary experiences. yet it has been the most difficult for us to really push. our current doubt seem to be taking us back to the fears of the early modern period, circular return that matches the swing around the globe that themselves went through the three acts of sheer drama. there were always more hopeful elements to the story. bright moments matter to mcaneny clear that the human passes a complicated and contradictory condition whether seen on a small-scale or a large one, even the largest of all, a geo-drama in three acts. well, i wish i could introduce you to all of
and rebuild those critical components right back in the same vulnerable environment. we can do this much smarter and cheaper over the long run. if we make the necessary investment to protect that situation from happening again. when it comes to things like propulsion power, signal systems, we know now that some of those critical elements that are absolutely critical to get that service up and running for 10% of the american economy are in very vulnerable places. none of us, no homeowner had their basement flood repeatedly take their best family heirlooms and stores it on the floor of the basement. we might buy some shelving or put the air loams on a shelf -- heirlooms on a shelf. if they say there are no mitigation investments we should put the family heirlooms on the floor of the basement again and wait for the next flood to happen. the other thing you need to remember is when we have these repeated disaster elements, much of those costs would be fema eligible so the taxpayer pays again. and we see no wisdom in that and is why we built but mitigation funding into the president's budget
people under the age of 18 who work in any sort of environment cannot work for some types of heavy machinery. if we put this as our national campaign for this year, it's unrealistic to think we of the youth parliament can make such a great influence on government legislation which have such huge opposition from larger companies. it's not realistic we can make a change in one year so we should focus on something which we can change, which is bettering our criminal almost -- better rur curriculum. [applause] >> who wave we got from the west midlands? you at the end. thank you. >> i'd like you all to raise your hands if you have an -- -- she gets paid five pounds. an older sister who is two years older gets paid seven pounds. how is that fair? >> who have we got from london? the chap there with the white shirt. yes, indeed, you, sir. >> thank you, mr. speaker. i'm john from london. i'd like to echo the other young people who said the minimum wage does create unemployment. it also creates unemployment for both small companies who can't afford to carry on the cost to their customers. ho
and veterans and defender of our environment. senator schatz will be a strong, progressive voice for hawaii in the united states senate. he will represent freedom and equality. he will be a strong voice on climate change, expanding clean, renewable energy and protecting our precious natural resources. he will defend our native hawaiians and all of our nation's first people, those americans who exercise sovereignty in lands that later became part of the united states. he will uphold the values and priorities of our unique state. i say to my friend, the new junior senator from hawaii, never forget that you are here with a solemn responsibility to do everything you can to represent the people of hawaii, to make sure that their needs are addressed in every policy discussion, to speak up and seek justice for those who cannot help themselves. god bless you, senator schatz. god bless hawaii. god bless the united states of america. mr. reid: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from nevada. mr. reid: before my friend from hawaii leaves the floor, we have all come and given speeches --
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